The cover of Jillian Tamaki's Boundless, which features a person with long, dark hair pulling it up into a ponytail.

Boundless: A Review

BoundlessTo fans of Black Mirror, Jillian Tamaki‘s new graphic novel Boundless provides an earnest, but less foreboding, look at the ways in which technology and modern living can go awry. In each story, This One Summer co-author Tamaki draws from all-too-real anxieties about life in the social media age, mashing them up with a Kafkaesque sense of magical realism that leaves the reader feeling refreshed, instead of weighed down. Continue reading

A photograph by Andrea Reiman of the moon setting over a plateau.

The Stone Sky: A Review

The Stone Sky (The Broken Earth, #3)The Broken Earth trilogy concludes with The Stone Sky, an unputdownable final installment in author N.K. Jemisin‘s latest SFF series. Separated by the most recent Fifth Season, Essun and Nassun find themselves on a collision course as they race to end their planet’s seismic flux, once and for all. As you might have guessed, the following may spoil the events of The Fifth Season and The Obelisk Gate, my reviews of which you can read here and here. Continue reading

The Accusation Review

The Accusation: A Review

The AccusationIt’s only natural to expect people in the U.S. to be fascinated by — and a little wary of — news out of North Korea. The Hermit Kingdom has become our new boogeyman, replacing China and Russia as the focus of our Red Scare. But given the United States’ near-total lack of communication with the other country, the bulk of our narratives about North Korea come from outsiders, from imaginative novelists and traveling teachers, or from defectors who have successfully found asylum elsewhere. All of this warrants saying, because all of this is necessary for readers to understand just how unique The Accusation, the first foreign-published book by a North Korean author living in North Korea — in this case, Bandi — is. There’s no other short-story collection like it in the world. Continue reading