A woman carrying an umbrella attempts to enter a building through a neon-lit side entrance.

Bad Friends: A Review

The cover of Ancco's Bad Friends, which shows three teenage girls sitting in a circle.

Han Kang, Min Jin Lee, and Crystal Hana Kim have given us their own unique glimpses into the Korean peninsula’s history and present, but few novels of South Korea have gone to so dark a place as Ancco‘s semi-autobiographical work, Bad Friends. This brief, striking vision of South Korea’s early Sixth Republic presents a side of the country rarely seen in the West, one driven by alcohol, drugs, and prostitution.

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A blood orange, peeled and halved, lies partially covered on a wrinkled, black sheet.

Fruit of Knowledge: A Review

Fruit Of Knowledge: The Vulva vs. The Patriarchy

I was in my senior year of college before I learned to spot the widespread vilification of vulvas and vaginas. In reading Swedish artist Liv Strömquist‘s graphic novel, Fruit of Knowledge: The Vulva vs. The Patriarchy, I relived every emotion and thought I had at the moment of realization. For feminists looking to renew and refocus their fury, it’s hard to beat Fruit of Knowledge as light reading. Continue reading

A photograph of a poppy next to the Yezidi Shrine of Khiz Rahman in Baadre, Iraqi Kurdistan, taken by Levi Clancy in 2017.

Poppies of Iraq: A Review

Poppies of IraqIn their new graphic memoir about her life growing up in Iraq, Brigitte Findakly and her husband Lewis Trondheim shed light on the interior lives of middle-class Iraqis under Saddam Hussein’s rule in the mid-20th century. Poppies of Iraq does for 1970s Iraq what Persepolis did for 1970s Iran, putting a human face to stories tainted in the West by orientalism. And eventually, like Persepolis author Marjane Satrapi, Findakly moves to France to escape the political upheaval of her home country. Continue reading

Flight Path: A Review

Flight Path: A Review

Flight Path: A Search for Roots Beneath the World's Busiest AirportReturning to Atlanta after four years spent living in New York City, Hannah Palmer discovered that her three childhood homes had been eaten up by the sprawl of the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The new mom-to-be set out to discover how and when the airport happened to her houses, and what she learned became the basis for her first memoir, Flight Path: A Search for Roots beneath the World’s Busiest Airport. Continue reading